Site Map - skip to main content - dyslexic font - mobile - text - print

Hacker Public Radio

Your ideas, projects, opinions - podcasted.

New episodes Monday through Friday.


Please support our Patrons

Our hosting is kindly provided by Josh from AnHonestHost.com. We would appreciate it if you could donate to help reduce his costs in funding the hosting. He is also accepting bitcoins to 1KsxJr9HtsdaUeU7yaV9bk9bQi21UPBtUq
Please also consider supporting the https://archive.org/donate/ who are now hosting our media files. Right now, a generous supporter will match your contributions 3-to-1. So your $5 donation results in $20 for the Internet Archive.

Correspondent

Eric Duhamel

Host Image
Host ID: 317

I'm a 30-something programming/computer hobbyist in Southern California.
See more on my webpage http://www.noxbanners.net/ and follow me on http://loadaverage.org/ericxdu23


email: ericxdu23.nospam@nospam.gmail.com
episodes: 3

hpr2262 :: Abstracting Nurse Jesus

Released on 2017-04-04 under a CC-BY-SA license.

NOTE: the audio recording appears to have periodic jitter. As I recorded at 44.1 Khz this time, I wonder if my S2 just handles recording at a lower quality better, and if so I'll prefer lower quality over jitter in the recording.

In this episode I explain why and how I abstracted random number and choice generation into self-sustainable methods for objects.

  • A superclass was needed so that all the classes of object in the game engine would have access to these random generation methods.
  • I preferred to use methods in this case so objects would be self-sufficient and wouldn't depend on extra modules imported at the top of my code.
  • The syntactic sugar achieved by using customized methods instead of i.e. random.randint(0, 99) makes the code easier to write and understand at a glance.
  • Nurse Jesus is a pun on the acronym RNG for Random Number Generator
  • Let me know if you get the reference at 2:00 ;-)

I recorded this episode in parts using a program called Urecord on my pocket computer (mobile phone).

I program using Pygame, post on a GNU Social account, and maintain a personal website at NoxBanners.NET. I study programming techniques at Refactoring.com, style at Python.org, and sometimes patterns at Portland Pattern Repository


hpr2256 :: Modular Game Scaling

Released on 2017-03-27 under a CC-BY-SA license.

NOTE: the audio didn't cut together as smoothly as I remember from the first time, probably because I forgot to record at 44.1 KHz

In this episode I explain in broad terms how I programmed a game system to adjust its display resolution using three distinct modules operating individually and in concert.

  • The "metagame" (launcher) module accepts an argument describing the size of the window available for display
  • The "gameplay" module is informed of the space available as a 'window' into the game world and uses it for one thing or another
  • The "graphics" module opens a window at the specified size and modifies the graphical assets if needed

Once again I recorded in parts using a program called Urecord on my pocket computer (mobile phone).

I program using Pygame, post on a GNU Social account, maintain a personal website at NoxBanners.NET, and study programming techniques at Refactoring.com, style at Python.org, and sometimes patterns at Portland Pattern Repository


hpr1896 :: User Local Software

Released on 2015-11-09 under a CC-BY-SA license.

In this recording I describe how I decided where to store software that I downloaded manually, as opposed to software that is installed and organized automatically by GNU/Linux systems.

SPOILER: I settled on ~/local/src/ and ~/local/opt/

Happy Halloween.

This is my first time recording a podcast. I recorded this in an afternoon when no one else was around except the furry kids and the neighbors outside. I've had the idea for this episode for a while, but having never recorded before didn't really know when/where/how to do it until just now.

The perspective of this episode comes from a GNU/Linux user since Sept. 2012, and a little bit of experience from 2002-2004. I'm interested in easy, simple solutions that everyone can use to solve problems or use new things.

Special thanks to Clacke for recommending in his recent episode the free/open-source Android recording application uRecord available from F-Droid. The resulting audio sounds great and uRecord is very easy to use. I recorded several separate paragraphs and concatenated them with Audacity.


Become a Correspondent