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Hacker Public Radio

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Correspondent

The Bishop

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Host ID: 343

Hi, i am The Bishop from Berlin/Germany.
My computer experience started more than 30 years ago with Commodore Plus 4 and Commodore 64. Later on i continued with Commodore Amiga 500 and Amiga 1200. My first PC was an 80286-based. I started using Linux with Slackware 3.2(?) and Kernel 2.0.20.

My favourite topics are compression technology and cryptography. I'm a guy interested in low level stuff down to the raw bits, i leave the modern GUI-programming for others.


email: bishop-hpr.nospam@nospam.mondkalbantrieb.de
episodes: 1

hpr2133 :: Compression technology part 1

Released on 2016-10-05 under a CC-BY-SA license.

Fax (short for facsimile), sometimes called telecopying or telefax (the latter short for telefacsimile), is the telephonic transmission of scanned printed material (both text and images), normally to a telephone number connected to a printer or other output device. The original document is scanned with a fax machine (or a telecopier), which processes the contents (text or images) as a single fixed graphic image, converting it into a bitmap, and then transmitting it through the telephone system in the form of audio-frequency tones. The receiving fax machine interprets the tones and reconstructs the image, printing a paper copy.[1] Early systems used direct conversions of image darkness to audio tone in a continuous or analog manner. Since the 1980s, most machines modulate the transmitted audio frequencies using a digital representation of the page which is compressed to quickly transmit areas which are all-white or all-black.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fax

Run-length encoding (RLE) is a very simple form of lossless data compression in which runs of data (that is, sequences in which the same data value occurs in many consecutive data elements) are stored as a single data value and count, rather than as the original run. This is most useful on data that contains many such runs. Consider, for example, simple graphic images such as icons, line drawings, and animations. It is not useful with files that don't have many runs as it could greatly increase the file size.

RLE may also be used to refer to an early graphics file format supported by CompuServe for compressing black and white images, but was widely supplanted by their later Graphics Interchange Format. RLE also refers to a little-used image format in Windows 3.x, with the extension rle, which is a Run Length Encoded Bitmap, used to compress the Windows 3.x startup screen.

Typical applications of this encoding are when the source information comprises long substrings of the same character or binary digit.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Run-length_encoding


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