<html><head></head><body>I have to agree here. For HPR, rejecting Copyrighted matertial in all of its Disney glory is elemental for two reasons.<br><br>First, I see HPR as an exemplar of and AdHoc project that operates on 100% voluntary human interaction. That's heroic.<br><br>Direct confrontation with the 'don't steal my idea¬©' crowd is not parallel with HPR's normal purpose. There's no tangible gain there.<br><br>A link in the show notes side steps this whole problem. Leave the ¬© stuff where it is. There are plenty of episodes where this has been done and some I recall where that was explicitly mentioned.<br><br> <br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On May 23, 2019 10:47:49 AM GMT-05:00, lostnbronx <lostnbronx@gmail.com> wrote:<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">
<pre class="k9mail">The question really isn't about this one episode, is it? This is<br>really about policy. When it come to policy, I see the question in<br>these terms:<br><br>Is there reasonable concern about the copyright of the content?<br><br>I don't know about others, but the fact that this has become the<br>subject of so much discussion answers that question for me; both, for<br>this situation, and for any others in the future.<br><br>If the content, in total, isn't released under some sort of shareable<br>license -- either through the intent of the copyright holder, or<br>through the auspices of time and Public Domain -- then how is this<br>even a point of contention?<hr>Hpr mailing list<br>Hpr@hackerpublicradio.org<br><a href="http://hackerpublicradio.org/mailman/listinfo/hpr_hackerpublicradio.org">http://hackerpublicradio.org/mailman/listinfo/hpr_hackerpublicradio.org</a><br></pre></blockquote></div><br>-- <br>Sent from my Android device with K-9 Mail. Please excuse my brevity.</body></html>