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Hacker Public Radio

Your ideas, projects, opinions - podcasted.

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In-Depth Series

GNU Readline

GNU Readline is a software library that provides line-editing and history capabilities for interactive programs with a command-line interface, such as Bash. It is currently maintained by Chet Ramey as part of the GNU Project. This series looks at some of the features of this powerful library.

The power of GNU Readline - part 3 - Dave Morriss | 2018-03-09

The power of GNU Readline - part 3

In part 2 we looked at deleting text in various ways and pasting it back, using GNU Readline key sequences.

The full-length notes (available here) contain some new terms and features of GNU Readline, and introduce some further ways of manipulating text, with some examples.


The power of GNU Readline - part 2 - Dave Morriss | 2017-12-27

The power of GNU Readline - part 2

In part 1 we looked at some Control key and Meta key sequences as well as the Backspace and DEL keys in the context of GNU Readline.

The full-length notes (available here) contain a brief summary of what we covered and introduce cutting and pasting the GNU Readline way, with some examples.


The power of GNU Readline - part 1 - Dave Morriss | 2016-07-13

The power of GNU Readline - part 1

We all use GNU Readline if we we use the CLI in Linux because it manages input, line editing and command history in Bash and in many tools.

I have been using Unix and later Linux since the 1980's, and gradually learnt how to do things like jump to the start or the end of the line, delete a character backwards up to a space, or delete the entire line.

I think that learning GNU Readline is worthwhile since it contains a lot more features than what I just described. I thought I would do a few episodes on HPR to introduce some of what I consider to be the most useful features.

I want to keep the episodes short since this is a dry subject, and, if you are anything like me, you can't take in more than a few key sequences at a time.

The source of my information is the GNU Readline Manual. This is very well written, if a little overwhelming.

To read the rest of the notes for this episode follow this link: http://hackerpublicradio.org/eps/hpr2073/full_shownotes.html