Site Map - skip to main content - dyslexic font - mobile - text - print

Hacker Public Radio

Your ideas, projects, opinions - podcasted.

New episodes Monday through Friday.


In-Depth Series

Learning sed

Episodes about using sed, the Stream Editor. It's a non-interactive editor which you can use to make simple changes to data, which is how many people use it. However, sed also has a lot of hidden power, especially in the GNU version.

Introduction to sed - part 5 - Dave Morriss | 2016-06-24

Introduction to sed - part 5

This episode is the last one in the "Introduction to sed" series.

In the last episode we looked at the full story of how sed works with the hold and pattern buffers. We looked at some of the commands that we had not yet seen and how they can be used to do more advanced processing using sed's buffers.

In this episode we will look at a selection of the remaining commands, which might be described as quite obscure (even very obscure). We will also look at some of the example sed scripts found in the GNU sed manual.

To read the rest of the notes for this episode follow this link: http://hackerpublicradio.org/eps/hpr2060/full_shownotes.html


Introduction to sed - part 4 - Dave Morriss | 2016-04-18

Introduction to sed - part 4

In the last episode we looked at some of the more frequently used sed commands, having spent previous episodes looking at the s command, and we also covered the concept of line addressing.

In this episode we will look at how sed really works in all the gory details, examine some of the remaining sed commands and begin to build useful sed programs.

To read the rest of the notes for this episode follow this link: http://hackerpublicradio.org/eps/hpr2011/full_shownotes.html


Introduction to sed - part 3 - Dave Morriss | 2016-03-29

Introduction to sed - part 3

In the last episode we looked at sed at a more advanced level. We looked at all of the command-line options which we will cover in this series and examined the s command in much more detail. We covered many more details of regular expressions.

In this episode we will look at more sed commands and how to use them.

To read the rest of the notes for this episode follow this link: http://hackerpublicradio.org/eps/hpr1997/full_shownotes.html


Introduction to sed - part 2 - Dave Morriss | 2016-03-14

Introduction to sed - part 2

In the last episode we looked at sed at the simplest level. We looked at three command-line options and the 's' command. We introduced the idea of basic regular expressions.

In this episode we will cover all of these topics in more detail.

We are looking at GNU sed in this series. This version contains many extensions to POSIX sed. These extensions provide many more features, but sed scripts written this way are not portable.

To read the rest of the notes for this episode follow this link: http://hackerpublicradio.org/eps/hpr1986/full_shownotes.html

Note: Since recording the audio I have added a sixth example to the full notes to cover the topic of word boundaries, which I had omitted at the time.


Introduction to sed - part 1 - Dave Morriss | 2016-02-29

Introduction to sed - part 1

sed is an editor which expects to read a stream of text, apply some action to the text and send it to another stream. It filters and transforms the text along the way according to instructions provided to it. These instructions are referred to as a sed script.

The name "sed" comes from Stream Editor, and sed was developed from 1973 to 1974 as a Unix utility by Lee E. McMahon of Bell Labs. GNU sed added several new features including better documentation, though most of it is only available on the command line through the info command. The full manual is of course available on the web.

To read the rest of the notes for this episode follow this link: http://hackerpublicradio.org/eps/hpr1976/full_shownotes.html