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Hacker Public Radio

Your ideas, projects, opinions - podcasted.

New episodes Monday through Friday.


Welcome to HPR the Community Podcast Network

We started producing shows as Today with a Techie 9 years, 6 months, 20 days ago. Our shows are produced by listeners like you and can be on any topic that "are of interest to Hackers". If you listen to HPR then please consider contributing one show a year. If you record your show now it could be released in 16 days.

Latest Shows


hpr1755 :: 52 - LibreOffice Impress - Moving Around

Introduction to the Impress application screen layout.


Hosted by Ahuka on 2015-04-24 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Series: LibreOffice | Comments (0)

Now we can start to take a look at the actual Impress application, and we begin by looking a how the program is laid out on the screen. Knowing where to find key features is important in using the program efficiently. For more go to http://www.ahuka.com/?page_id=1112


hpr1754 :: D7? Why Seven?

I explain what 7th chords are and when to use them.


Hosted by Jon Kulp on 2015-04-23 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Comments (2)

In this episode I respond to one of the community-requested topics ("Music Theory") and try to explain what seventh chords are and why they are used. Below are some of the terms that I use in the course of the discussion.

  • Interval: The distance between two pitches (sounded either consecutively or simultaneously)
  • Consonance: Relatively stable sound between two or more pitches
  • Dissonance: Relatively unstable sound between two or more pitches. Dissonance often needs a "resolution" to consonance
  • Chord: three or more notes sounded together
  • Chord progression: a succession of chords
  • Triad: a chord with 3 pitches, the adjacent pitches separated by the interval of the 3rd.
  • Seventh chord: a chord with 4 pitches, the adjacent pitches separated by the interval of the 3rd.
  • Tonality: harmonic system that governs the use of major and minor keys
  • Tonic: the central tone of a piece of music
  • Mode: major or minor [e.g. Symphony no. 5 in C minor]
  • Modulation: the process of changing keys within a piece of music
  • Scale: Ascending or descending series of notes that define a key or tonality, with a specific arrangements of half-steps and whole-steps. Major and Minor scales are most common in Western music

Free public-domain music reference book: Music Notation and Terminology by Karl Wilson Gehrkens: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/19499 (see ch. 18)

Free Online Music Dictionary: http://dictionary.onmusic.org/


hpr1753 :: Introducing a 5 year old to Sugar on Toast

This is a podcast in Spanglish (some spanish, some english) with a 5 year old and a 1 year old.


Hosted by amp on 2015-04-22 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
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This was me introducing my 5 year old to her new laptop with Sugar on Toast.

A family member had no use for an old 7 year old netbook so I installed the trisquel version of Sugar, the one laptop per child operating system.

This is a response to this episode: http://hackerpublicradio.org/eps.php?id=1726 I find it ticks all the boxes.

Recorded with a phone and spoken mainly in a different language. I did conversion to FLAC from a mono mp3 probably the same if I just uploaded the MP3 directly. No editing was done.


hpr1752 :: Penguicon 2015 Promo

Penguicon 2015 happens on April 24-26, 2015 in Southfield, Michigan


Hosted by Ahuka on 2015-04-21 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
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Penguicon 2015 is a combined technology and sicence fiction convention in Southfield, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit, and will present over 350 hours of programming over the entire weekend. Of this, around 100 hours are open source, tech-related. In this episode I try to cover the coming attractions of the weekend and maybe entice some people to come join us. It will be a great weekend.

Links:


hpr1751 :: How I got into Linux

How I got into linux, LFS and where I use Linux now.

Hosted by Steve Bickle on 2015-04-20 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Comments (0)

My third show, its my How I got into Linux show, Crunchbang for the win, thank you Corenominal.

I actually wrote some of this up before I recorded my first show. I wasn't happy that I did a good enough job originally. However I decided to make use of a rainy day and get it updated and recorded. I cut out a chunk of rambling about floppy drive cleaners, and stuck some more up to date info on the end.


hpr1750 :: xclip, xdotool, xvkbd: 3 CLI Linux tools for RSI sufferers

3 command-line tools that save me hundreds of keystrokes a day.


Hosted by Jon Kulp on 2015-04-17 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Series: Accessibility | Comments (5)

Basic commands

Type the words "foo bar" with xvkbd:

xvkbd -xsendevent -secure -text 'foo bar'

Types out the entire contents of the file "foobar.txt" with xvkbd:

xvkbd -xsendevent -secure -file "foobar.txt"

Send text to the clipboard:

xclip -i

Send clipboard contents to standard output:

xclip -o

Do virtual Ctrl+C key combination with xdotool:

xdotool key Control+c

Save this complicated command as an environment variable—then the variable "$KEYPRESS" expands to this command.

export KEYPRESS="xvkbd -xsendevent -secure -text"

Examples

With virtual keystrokes and CLI access to the clipboard, you're limited only by your imagination and scripting ability. Here are some examples of how I use them, both for the manipulation of text and for navigation. The words in bold-face are the voice commands I use to launch the written commands.

Capitalize this. Copies selected text to the clipboard, pipes it through sed and back into the clipboard, then types fixed text back into my document:

xdotool key Control+c && xclip -o \
| sed 's/\(.*\)/\L\1/' \
| sed -r 's/\<./\U&/g' \
| xclip -i && $KEYPRESS "$(xclip -o)"

Go to grades. This example takes advantage of Firefox "quick search." I start with a single quote to match the linked text "grades" and press the Return key (\r) to follow the link:

$KEYPRESS "'grades\r"

First Inbox. From any location within Thunderbird I can run this command and it executes the keystrokes to take me to the first inbox and put focus on the first message:

xdotool key Control+k && $KEYPRESS "\[Tab]\[Home]\[Left]\[Right]\[Down]" && sleep .2 && xdotool key Tab

single ex staff. Type out an entire Lilypond template into an empty text editor window:

xvkbd -xsendevent -secure -file "/path/to/single_ex_staff.ly"

Paragraph Tags. Puts HTML paragraph tags around selected text:

#!/bin/bash

KEYPRESS='xvkbd -xsendevent -secure -text'

xdotool key Control+c

$KEYPRESS '<p>'
xdotool key Control+v
$KEYPRESS '</p>'

Launching commands with keystrokes in Openbox

I normally use blather voice commands to launch the scripts and keystroke commands, but I have a handful of frequently-used commands that I launch using keystroke combos configured in the Openbox config file (~/.config/openbox/rc.xml on my system). This block configures the super+n key combo to launch my examplelink.sh script.

<keybind key="W-n">
  <action name="Execute">
	<startupnotify>
	  <enabled>true</enabled>
	  <name>special</name>
	</startupnotify>
	<command>examplelink.sh</command>
  </action>
</keybind>

Links


hpr1749 :: Scale 13x Part 6 of 6

Justin King browser based emulated computer


Hosted by Lord Drachenblut on 2015-04-16 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Comments (1)

I am 13 years old and live in Santa Barbara. I have participated in the Open Source community for several years. My dad has been on the SCALE leadership team for a long time, and he introduced me to programming. My favorite programming languages are HTML and Javascript with Enyo because I like creating websites and webOS apps. I also program in Shell and some Python, and like making short animations using Blender. I have recently made the world's first emulator for the WITCH, the first currently working fixed-point decimal computer. I recently earned my Technician Amateur Radio license and enjoy attending radio club meetings. Besides geeking, I like to swim, act, and do fun events with the Boy Scouts.


hpr1748 :: Scale 13x Part 5 of 6

Four interviews from Scalex13


Hosted by Lord Drachenblut on 2015-04-15 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
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hpr1747 :: Scale 13x Part 4 of 6

Five interviews from Scale x13


Hosted by Lord Drachenblut on 2015-04-14 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
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hpr1746 :: Scale 13x Part 3 of 6

Eight interviews from Scale 13x


Hosted by Lord Drachenblut on 2015-04-13 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Comments (0)