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Hacker Public Radio

Your ideas, projects, opinions - podcasted.

New episodes Monday through Friday.


Welcome to HPR the Community Podcast Network

We started producing shows as Today with a Techie 9 years, 10 months, 24 days ago. Our shows are produced by listeners like you and can be on any topic that "are of interest to Hackers". If you listen to HPR then please consider contributing one show a year. If you record your show now it could be released in 5 days.

Call for shows

We are running very low on shows at the moment. Have a look at the hosts page and if you don't see "2015-??-??" next to your name, or if your name is not listed, you might consider sending us in something.

hpr queue showing an graph showing how few shows we have

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Latest Shows


hpr1845 :: 60 - LibreOffice Impress - The Gallery and Themes

LibreOffice Clip Art Gallery and Theme collections


Hosted by Ahuka on 2015-08-28 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Series: LibreOffice | Comments (0)

In the last tutorial we looked at pictures and how they can be used in Impress. But I left out one area because the tutorial was already running a bit long, and I wanted to give the Gallery and Themes the full attention they deserve. I think this is something a lot of people have missed when working with Impress, at least I have not seen these elements includes much in peoples presentations. But they are a wonderful addition to your toolkit, and well-worth some attention. Note that the Gallery is a common feature of all LibreOffice applications, and is available in applications like Writer and Calc, though there is less need for it there. It is when you get to applications like Impress and Draw that you really discover how useful it can be. For more go to http://www.ahuka.com/?page_id=1222

Links


hpr1844 :: The Marantz PMD 660 Professional Solid State Recorder

I talk about the recording device I inherited from my mother-in-law and use it to record the show


Hosted by Jon Kulp on 2015-08-27 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Comments (0)

The Marantz PMD 660 Professional Solid State Recorder

I inherited a really nice audio recorder and microphone from my mother-in-law recently and in this episode I talk all about it and use the new device to record the show.

Links

Credits

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hpr1843 :: Some Bash tips

A few useful Bash features that may not be well known


Hosted by Dave Morriss on 2015-08-26 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Series: Bash Scripting | Comments (2)

Today I want to talk about three Bash commands:

  • pushd
  • popd
  • dirs

These let you change directory on a Linux system (and others which support Bash) but keep a record of where you have been in a stack structure. The stack can be viewed and manipulated with these commands as well.

I have written out a moderately long set of notes about these commands and these are available here http://hackerpublicradio.org/eps/hpr1843_full_shownotes.html.


hpr1842 :: TiT Radio 20 You've Been Pwned (probably)

While peter is on walkabout, TiT Radio returns for a very short engagement


Hosted by FiftyOneFifty on 2015-08-25 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Series: Tit Radio | Comments (2)

Longtime listeners of Hacker Public Radio will remember 'TiT Radio', a semi-weekly FOSS "news" and commentary show that appeared on HPR, recorded by the cast of "Linux Cranks" on the off schedule weeks. "Linux Cranks" eventually morphed into the "Kernel Panic Oggcast". While Peter is on walkabout, the cast of KPO has resurrected "Tit Radio" on a temporary basis. The listener is cautioned, while KPO is family friendly, "TiT Radio" makes no such commitment. Please join netminer, FiftyOneFifty, and pegwole as they drag you down the rabbit hole that has always been "TiT Radio".

Our show topics were drawn from these links. Not all these topics made it into the show, but feel free to browse anyway:


hpr1841 :: My way into Linux

From punch cards to Manjaro

Hosted by folky on 2015-08-24 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Series: How I Found Linux | Comments (0)

I let espeak describe my way through the world of bits and bytes from the punch cards of our Partnerbrigade to my Manjaro-laptop of today.


hpr1840 :: Running external commands in Kate

Using the text filter option in the kate text editor.


Hosted by Ken Fallon on 2015-08-21 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Comments (0)

Kate is an excellent text editor. The "Text Filter" - enables easy text filtering, which by pressing Alt + Backslash pops up a screen that allows you to enter commands.

popup window showing the command

Settings > Configure Kate > Plugins > Text Filter

Kate (short for KDE Advanced Text Editor) is a text editor developed by KDE. It has been a part of KDE Software Compilation since version 2.2, which was first released in 2001. Geared towards software developers, it features syntax highlighting, code folding, customizable layouts, regular expression support, and extensibility.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kate_(text_editor)


hpr1839 :: My "New" Used Pickup Truck

I talk about my pickup truck and doing some repairs and stuff


Hosted by Jon Kulp on 2015-08-20 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Comments (0)

My "New" Used Pickup Truck

After 16 years my wife and I decided to become a 2-vehicle family, and as a result I got myself a 2004 Ford Ranger. In this episode I talk about the process of finding and purchasing the truck, and then about some repairs I did and some other stuff related to it.


hpr1838 :: Waking up with Windigo

An overview of a terrible, hacky method of waking up.


Hosted by Windigo on 2015-08-19 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Series: Bash Scripting | Comments (4)

This is a quick summary of my alarm clock system, written in bash and highly unreliable.

Hardware

My preferred hardware platform is a Dell Mini 9.

Software

My alarm clock is an embarrassing combination of bash scripts and Audacious, my favorite media player. Any media player will do, as long as it's scriptable.

How It Works

There are currently two bash scripts in my crappy alarm setup. One script is called "wakeup" and the other is called "wakeup-at".

wakeup is simply a wrapper that adds some error handling around audacious. It launches audacious if it can't find an instance running already, waits five seconds for it to get itself together, and then causes it to play. It is also currently broken, so the 'launching audacious' part doesn't work. I have to manually start audacious myself. FAILURE.

wakeup script:

#!/bin/bash
audacious &

sleep 5s

audacious -p &

You've noticed that the "wakeup" script doesn't actually have any timing involved; If you want to use it as an alarm, you get to combine it with the bash "sleep" command. This is not a failure, this is by design! An example alarm:

sleep 8h; wakeup

One problem with this methodology is that it requires math, and is prone to errors. If I'm going to sleep at 10:46:33 PM and need to wake up at 7:00 AM, I need to chain sleep commands together for each unit of time:

sleep 7h; sleep 14m; sleep 27s; wakeup

Get some of that math wrong, and you wake up at the wrong time. FAILURE.

"wakeup-at" is a wrapper around "wakeup" that uses the "at" utility to schedule the wakeup script. So, instead of using multiple sleep commands, it accepts any of the time formats that at accepts:

wakeup-at 7:00 AM
wakeup-at 6:00AM 2018-02-02
wakeup-at teatime

Here is the wakeup-at script:

#!/bin/bash

## Make sure we have enough arguments
if [ $# -lt 1 ]
then
  echo "Usage: `basename $0` <time>"
  exit 1
fi

echo "$@"

## Add custom time keywords
case "$1" in
"eternaldarkness")
	echo wakeup | at 3:33 AM
	;;

## Catch-all; send all arguments to at
*)
	echo wakeup | at $@
	;;
esac

If you make a syntax error, "at" tells you about it immediately. Its only failings are what it inherits from the original "wakeup" script.


hpr1837 :: Put an SSD in your Linux Box

What to check, read, and update if you want to upgrade your Linux PC with an Solid State Disk.

Hosted by 2BFrank on 2015-08-18 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Series: How I upgraded my equipment | Comments (2)

Some commands I mentioned that you should check out:

Check SSD disk specs:

sudo hdparm -I /dev/sdb

Check for TRIM support:

sudo fstrim -v /

Perform TRIM support

sudo hdparm -I /dev/sdb | grep -i TRIM

Detailed SSD Info


hpr1836 :: The Statusnet Shuffle

Theru and NYbill talk about moving a Statusnet instance and converting it to GNU-Social


Hosted by NYbill on 2015-08-17 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Comments (2)

Theru and NYbill talk about moving a Statusnet instance to a new server. Also, upgrading an existing Statusnet instance to GNU-social.