Site Map - skip to main content - dyslexic font - mobile - text - print

Hacker Public Radio

Your ideas, projects, opinions - podcasted.

New episodes Monday through Friday.


Our hosting is kindly provided by Josh from AnHonestHost.com. We would appreciate it if you could donate to help reduce his costs in funding the hosting.
He is also accepting bitcoins to 1KsxJr9HtsdaUeU7yaV9bk9bQi21UPBtUq

hpr2133 :: Compression technology part 1

Introduction to data reduction methods: Run-Length-Encoding

<< First, < Previous, Latest >>

Host Image
Hosted by The Bishop on 2016-10-05 is flagged as Clean and is released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. | Comments (1)

Fax (short for facsimile), sometimes called telecopying or telefax (the latter short for telefacsimile), is the telephonic transmission of scanned printed material (both text and images), normally to a telephone number connected to a printer or other output device. The original document is scanned with a fax machine (or a telecopier), which processes the contents (text or images) as a single fixed graphic image, converting it into a bitmap, and then transmitting it through the telephone system in the form of audio-frequency tones. The receiving fax machine interprets the tones and reconstructs the image, printing a paper copy.[1] Early systems used direct conversions of image darkness to audio tone in a continuous or analog manner. Since the 1980s, most machines modulate the transmitted audio frequencies using a digital representation of the page which is compressed to quickly transmit areas which are all-white or all-black.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fax

Run-length encoding (RLE) is a very simple form of lossless data compression in which runs of data (that is, sequences in which the same data value occurs in many consecutive data elements) are stored as a single data value and count, rather than as the original run. This is most useful on data that contains many such runs. Consider, for example, simple graphic images such as icons, line drawings, and animations. It is not useful with files that don't have many runs as it could greatly increase the file size.

RLE may also be used to refer to an early graphics file format supported by CompuServe for compressing black and white images, but was widely supplanted by their later Graphics Interchange Format. RLE also refers to a little-used image format in Windows 3.x, with the extension rle, which is a Run Length Encoded Bitmap, used to compress the Windows 3.x startup screen.

Typical applications of this encoding are when the source information comprises long substrings of the same character or binary digit.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Run-length_encoding


Comments

Subscribe to the comments RSS feed.

Comment #1 posted on 2016-10-12T11:45:49Z by rtsn

Good episode!

I just wanted to sat that I really enjoyed this episode. I love the "light"-technical episodes with a good balance between hand-wavy explanations and preciseness. It gets be interested and makes me want to learn more.

Keep it up!

Leave Comment

Note to Verbose Commenters
If you can't fit everything you want to say in the comment below then you really should record a response show instead.

Note to Spammers
All comments are moderated. All links are checked by humans. We strip out all html. Feel free to
record a show about yourself, or your industry, or any other topic we may find interesting. We also check shows for spam :).

Provide feedback
Your Name/Handle:
Title:
Comment:
Anti Spam Question: What does the P in HPR stand for ?
Are you a spammer →
Who hosted this show →
What does HPR mean to you ?