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Hacker Public Radio

Your ideas, projects, opinions - podcasted.

New episodes Monday through Friday.


In-Depth Series

OggCamp

OggCamp
A Free Culture Unconference

Linux Voice magazine at OggCamp - beni | 2015-01-22

Corenominal and Beni talking to the guys of the newly founded Linux Voice magazine. It's a British Linux publication that's less than a year old.

We talked to them about why you would found a magazine these days, why their magazine is still relevant in the digital age and why kinds won't beat them at mario cart.

Linux Voice Cover

You find their magazine here:

http://www.linuxvoice.com/

and their superb Linux postcast by the same name here:

http://www.linuxvoice.com/category/podcasts/


Frist Time at Oggcamp - Al | 2014-11-18

This episode is about how Al and Jerry Meet at Oggcamp. What we enjoy about the event,what to expect and encourage people to attend next year.

This is my second HPR episode after beni recorded a interview with me at oggcamp and said I should submit my own episode

Links

http://adminadminpodcast.co.uk

Spaceteam - beni | 2014-10-14

If this show only confuses you, search the Internet for the Android app Spaceteam, have some friends install it and start playing. To maximize the fun you preferably play in a public place.

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.sleepingbeastgames.spaceteam&hl=en


Interview with Dave Hingley - Mike Hingley | 2013-11-19

In this episode Mike Hingley interviews his brother after oggcamp 2013 (www.oggcamp.org), and Dave talks about linux and hardware problems.

Links

Titanium Bunker: http://www.titaniumbunker.com/

OggCamp: http://oggcamp.org/


OGGCamp13 Bonus Track - Various Hosts | 2013-11-15

"OGGcamp, I was there, it was a fight." -Theru

If you want to hear four grown men ironing in a tiny hotel room, this is for you. This was a recording made while Navigium, Timttmy, Theru, and NYbill ruined... I mean made OGGcamp13 HPR shirts an hour before doors opened on Saturday.

Pics:


Day two of interviews from OGGcamp 13. - Various Hosts | 2013-11-14

Day two of interviews from OGGcamp 13.

Pics:


Day one of interviews from OGGcamp 13. - Various Hosts | 2013-11-13

Day one of interviews from OGGcamp 13.

Pics:


Ken gets to talk with Ambjorn about politics - Ken Fallon | 2013-07-03

In today's show Ken finally gets around to releasing shows recorded at OggCamp11

OggCamp 11 was a two-day unconference where technology enthusiasts came together to exchange knowledge on a wide range of topics from Linux and open source software to building home automation systems. It was held August 13 and 14 at Farnham Maltings in Surrey in the UK.

Ken gets to talk with Ambjorn about politics.

Links

Winning and Losing Freedoms through Real Politics: http://blip.tv/episode/5496173


OggCamp11: Interview with Marie Assen from Flatter - Ken Fallon | 2013-06-26

In today's show Ken finally gets around to releasing shows recorded at OggCamp11

OggCamp 11 was a two-day unconference where technology enthusiasts came together to exchange knowledge on a wide range of topics from Linux and open source software to building home automation systems. It was held August 13 and 14 at Farnham Maltings in Surrey in the UK.

Flattr: The social way to get paid

In today's show Ken chats with Marie and stories are told of life and trust.


Nathan Dumont on Open Source Hardware - Ken Fallon | 2013-06-20

In today's show Ken finally gets around to releasing shows recorded at OggCamp11

OggCamp 11 was a two-day unconference where technology enthusiasts came together to exchange knowledge on a wide range of topics from Linux and open source software to building home automation systems. It was held August 13 and 14 2011at Farnham Maltings in Surrey in the UK.

Open Source Hardware

Nathan and Ken have a chat in the beer garden after ogg camp.

Links


OGG Camp 11. Post-event Commentary with Alan Pope - Robin Catling | 2012-09-13

This show was recorded last year

Welcome to the Full Circle Podcast on Hacker Public Radio. This is the last of our highlights of last Summers unconference, OGG Camp eleven, held at Farnham Maltings in the South of England.

This show is a post-unconference de-brief with Alan Pope, one of the event organisers and friend of the show.

OGG Camp is a joint venture organised by those lovely podcasters the Linux Outlaws and the Ubuntu UK Podcast.

Alan has since joined Canonical as ‘Engineering Manager in Product Strategy, Engineering Ubuntu for hardware on a variety of devices. Strategy includes the Shuttleworth plan for Ubuntu on Everything.

Find Alan at popey.com/blog (tagline DON'T YOU KNOW WHO I AM!!) and in his regular appearances as the host of the Ubuntu UK Podcast at http://podcast.ubuntu-uk.org/

His wiki page is at https://wiki.ubuntu.com/AlanPope

The Full Circle Podcast is the companion to Full Circle Magazine, the Independent Magazine for the Ubuntu Community. Find us at www.fullcirclemagazine.org/podcast.

Feedback; you can post comments and feedback on the podcast page at www.fullcirclemagazine.org/podcast, send us a comment to podcast (at) fullcirclemagazine.org

Your Hosts:

Additional audio by Victoria Pritchard

Runtime: 16mins 18seconds


OGG Camp 11 Panel Discussion - Robin Catling | 2012-08-30

This was recorded last year

Welcome to the Full Circle Podcast on Hacker Public Radio. This is the third of our highlights of last Summers unconference, OGG Camp-11, held at Farnham Maltings in the South of England.

Introducing the OGG Camp-11 Panel Discussion

On the panel we have:

  • Dan Lynch of Linux Outlaws, our Chairman
  • Karen Sandler of the Gnome Foundation and ex-Software Freedom Law Center
  • Simon Phipps of Forgerock and the Open Software Initiative
  • Stuart ‘Aq’ Langridge, from Canonical's UbuntuOne team and ex-LUG Radio presenter
  • Fabian Scherschel of Linux Outlaws

Like every good panel Discussion, this all begins with questions from the floor

OGG Camp is a joint venture organised by those lovely podcasters the Linux Outlaws and the Ubuntu UK Podcast.

We've more highlights of OGG Camp coming up on the Full Circle Podcast very soon, including Andy Piper and Laura Cjaikowski.

The Full Circle Podcast is the companion to Full Circle Magazine, the Independent Magazine for the Ubuntu Community. Find us at www.fullcirclemagazine.org/podcast.

Feedback; you can post comments and feedback on the podcast page at www.fullcirclemagazine.org/podcast, send us a comment to podcast (at) fullcirclemagazine.org

Your Hosts:

Additional audio by Victoria Pritchard

Runtime: 40mins 56seconds


OggCamp12 Farewell - Ken Fallon | 2012-08-24

I was leaving my hotel room after the end of OggCamp, thinking to myself I had enough interviews recorded and something made me go back and get my recorders. I'm glad I did as I bagged some fantastic interviews.

The first one was with Rebecca Newborough web mistress of the Lincoln LUG http://lincoln.lug.org.uk/ on how to start a LUG. The first step is to visit the UK Linux User Groups site at http://lug.org.uk/

We all went to the Leaf venue for food and conversation http://thisisleaf.co.uk/#/on-bold-street/, while there I interviewed a few gentlemen starting with Kris Findlay about changes at his LUG and his work at Krisilis IT Solutions www.krisilis.com
Raspberry Pi GPIO Demo http://www.slideshare.net/azmodie/introduction-to-raspberry-pi-and-gpio

Introduction to Raspberry Pi and GPIO from Kris Findlay

Video on youtube (should also play after slide 14 on slideshare) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZkXMnCBs2ms
The Software Society http://www.thesoftwaresociety.org.uk

Then we had a chat with Ian Closs over from Ireland. We discussed the local FLOSS scene, Mark Shuttleworth https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Shuttleworth who will be attending SkyCon http://skycon.skynet.ie/2012/ and Archeology.

To round it all off a long round up with Fabian A. Scherschel http://sixgun.org/fabsh/ who true to his word gave me an interview for HPR. Of course he is still on record to submit a show to HPR himself.

You might think that's the end of OggCamp but I still have shows from last year to post :)


OggCamp12 Day2 The morning after the night before - Ken Fallon | 2012-08-23

Skipping our usual Syndicated Thursday, we're continuing our week long fix of OggCamp12.

Today it's day two, or the morning after the night before where we interview:


OggCamp12 Hardware Hackers - Ken Fallon | 2012-08-22

This is the second show from OggCamp12 where I walk around the hardware hacking area. A big thank you to all the people I interviewed and who took the time to explain their project to me.

OggCamp12


OggCamp 2012: Simon Phipps: mini-intro to the CDB - doubi | 2012-08-21

Be Very Afraid! In this mini-interview Simon gives a quick introduction to the Communications Data Bill, recently introduced to the UK Parliament, which proposes to establish a nation-wide database of all citizens' text and email communications, and explains the problems with the proposals, notably the lack of judicial oversight and the massive potential for mission creep.

Transcript:

doubi: We're here at OggCamp 2012 at John Moores University in Liverpool and I'm here with Simon Phipps who's going to be giving a talk tomorrow on behalf of the Open Rights Group. Simon, what will your talk be about?

Simon Phipps: I'm going to be talking about the Communications Data Bill, which is a piece of legislation that's just about to go through Parliament, and has very worrying consequences for people's civil liberties on the internet.

doubi: Right, "Communications Data" maybe doesn't sound like it's to do with people's civil liberties, so what's it all about?

Simon: Well, this is a Bill that solves a problem for the security services in the UK, in particular the secret service that we have over here, and the police forces. They're very worried that they can't see what's going on inside your email, and inside your text messaging, and inside your other online communications.

They have for a long time been trying to get a succession of governments to put into law rules that allow them to snoop on all of your communications. They tried to do it under [the previous Labour Party government], and it didn't quite work out because there was an outcry in civil society about it, and it's now happening under the Tories and Liberal Democrats. So this is not a partisan issue at all. This is an activity that is arising out of the Cheltenham data centre that is used by the intelligence services and arising out of the police forces, who are all very worried that they can't read your email.

doubi: Now, I've heard a little bit about this and I've heard it pitched in terms of, "This is the security services just trying to keep up with changing technology." What do you say to that, because people obviously people are using different forms of communication now; is there anything legitimate in the security services needing to "keep up" with that?

Simon: I think it's legitimate for them to need to "keep up" but that is not a good excuse for them to do what they're doing here, because what they're doing is creating a right to ask every internet service provider to keep, for twelve months, all of your traffic on the internet, so they can analyse it off-line. That gives them plenty of time to crack SSH, to crack SSL keys, to crack any encryption that's going on.

The big problem is that this right is being created fresh, it's being created without any right for you to know that it's happening, it's being created without any judicial oversight, so that the police can just decide to ask for your material to be created. It's also being created in such a way that should the police choose to they could create a central database of all this information that could then be casually searched.

By "casually searched", I mean it could be searched, for example, by organisations enforcing family law disputes, organisations enforcing defaults on mortgage payments, organisations who are looking into whether you have renewed the MOT [annual road-worthiness test] on your car. All of those would be the sort of excuses to go dipping in on a fishing expedition on your personal data.

So what's being proposed is not just keeping up to date with technology, it's going way, way, way beyond any scope for keeping up, and it's creating for the first time a database of citizen communications that can then in the future be fished-into arbitrarily, without notification, without recourse and without judicial oversight.

doubi: It might sound to people like some of the examples you gave about the misuse of such a database are hypothetical or facetious, but already if people were to go to the Open Rights Group website, openrightsgroup.org there are on the wiki there are documented examples of how local councils, both individuals and in an official capacity, are already abusing some of these databases that are intended for much more serious purposes and are ostensibly there to save us from real threats [NB: This is inaccurate; please see footnote].

Simon: When these things get started, they're always packed in guarantees that nobody will do anything bad with your data. The CDB is no different: all of the padding around it says, "Trust us to create this database of communications, because look at all these protections we're putting around it to prevent abuse." Now what we know is that once you've created a resource, mission creep in the future will change the way that it's used.

Take for example the congestion charge cameras in London. All around London now there are number-plate [license-plate] recognition cameras that were put there only to collect congestion charges. But as time has gone by, people have found other, extremely legitimate uses for them: to prevent terrorism, to enforce laws. And now they are part of a network that the police can routinely use to identify the location of any vehicle in central London. That wasn't what the cameras were put there for, and when they were set up we were told that wasn't going to happen.

I look at the CDB and I believe it's exactly the same thing. The thing that's wrong with the Communications Data Bill is not the uses to which the authorities will put the data, it is creating the repository of data in the first place.

doubi: Absolutely. And I think together with the lack of judicial oversight which you already mentioned, those are the really scary aspects about this. What can people do at this stage?

Simon: Well, at the lowest level what people can do it join the Open Rights Group. The Open Rights Group is an organisation which is funded largely from the membership fees of its members. You can visit openrightsgroup.org and sign up, set up a standing order to pay is little as £5 a month, that will help to pay for professional researchers to understand all these highly complex laws, and then go and engage on your behalf, to make sure that the bad things don't happen.

If you're more motivated than that, than just joining, you could get involved with a local chapter of the Open Rights Group. There are local chapters all over the UK, where you can meet with other like-minded people and take local action: ttalking with MPs, talking with local radio stations, talking with local newspapers, and making sure that the digital rights agenda of the individal citizen has as loud a voice as the media lobby is able to bring to corporate concerns.

doubi: Sounds great. Simon, thank you very much; do you want to give your vital statistics, where to find you on the web?

Simon: I do all sorts of things of the web. They are all locatable from my website webmink.com.

doubi: Thank you very much, looking forward to your presentation tomorrow, and enjoy OggCamp!

Simon: Thank you very much.



NB: I was quite wrong about the ORG wiki. There isn't a page about concerted abuses of centralised data repositories as such; what there is the UK Privacy Debacles page, which lists (worryingly numerous) examples of companies and public bodies accidentally losing or releasing data. There's only one example of malicious abuse by an individual.

However, these examples of organisational incompetence to deal with data in themselves give an independent reason why the data store proposed by the CDB is a bad idea. Secondly, the examples of misuse of investigative resources and powers has been well documented elsewhere ([1], [2]).


OggCamp 12 Day 1 Part 1 - Ken Fallon | 2012-08-20

This is the first of an all week extravaganza covering the party that was OggCamp 12. It was held on August 18 / 19 2012 in the Art & Design Academy Liverpool John Moores University Liverpool, L3 5RD

The levels are all over the place and I don’t have the time to edit it further as I’ve been traveling all day. So in the spirit of HPR, I’ll put content over audio quality and release it as is.

Thanks to everyone who I interviewed.


OggCamp11: Oracle Linux - JWP | 2012-08-02

In todays long over due show we interview out very own presenter JWP and listen to his talk given at OggCamp11.

Simon Phipps on Open Software: OGG Camp Part One - Robin Catling | 2012-05-30

This is the first of our highlights of last Summer's unconference, OGG Camp eleven, held at Farnham Maltings in the South of England.

Introducing Simon Phipps, who presented the opening session of the unconference to a packed main hall, on Software Freedom.

A computer industry veteran, Simon Phipps came on with an actual box of hats which he proceeded the change at speed, reminding me of Tommy Cooper in his heyday.

Simon has come up through hands-on roles as field engineer, programmer and systems analyst, run a software publishing company, worked with OSI standards in the eighties, on the first commercial collaborative conferencing software in the nineties, and helped introduce both Java and XML at IBM.

A founding Director of the Open Mobile Alliance, Simon is Chief Strategy Officer at independent software company ForgeRock and Director of the Open Source Initiative. Find his essays at webmink.com.

Simon Phipps’ presentation on software freedom. Here’s a shortened version of the presentation which ran to 35 minutes in its entirety.

OGG Camp is a joint venture organised by those lovely podcasters the Linux Outlaws and the Ubuntu UK Podcast.

We've more highlights of OGG Camp coming up on the Full Circle Podcast very soon, including Karen Sandler and the Ogg Camp Panel discussion.

The Full Circle Podcast is the companion to Full Circle Magazine, the Independent Magazine for the Ubuntu Community. Find us at www.fullcirclemagazine.org/podcast.

Feedback; you can post comments and feedback on the podcast page at www.fullcirclemagazine.org/podcast, send us a comment to podcast (at) fullcirclemagazine.org

Your Hosts:

Additional audio by Victoria Pritchard

Runtime: 18mins 2seconds


Product lifecycle management (PLM) - Ken Fallon | 2011-12-26

In today's show Ken has a discussion with Alister Munroe about product lifecycle management at OggCamp 11

Product lifecycle management

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A generic lifecycle of products

PLM In industry, product lifecycle management (PLM) is the process of managing the entire lifecycle of a product from its conception, through design and manufacture, to service and disposal. PLM integrates people, data, processes and business systems and provides a product information backbone for companies and their extended enterprise.

Product lifecycle management (PLM) should be distinguished from 'Product life cycle management (marketing)' (PLCM). PLM describes the engineering aspect of a product, from managing descriptions and properties of a product through its development and useful life; whereas, PLCM refers to the commercial management of life of a product in the business market with respect to costs and sales measures.

Product lifecycle management is one of the four cornerstones of a corporation's information technology structure. All companies need to manage communications and information with their customers (CRM-customer relationship management), their suppliers (SCM-supply chain management), their resources within the enterprise (ERP-enterprise resource planning) and their planning (SDLC-systems development life cycle). In addition, manufacturing engineering companies must also develop, describe, manage and communicate information about their products.

One form of PLM is called people-centric PLM. While traditional PLM tools have been deployed only on release or during the release phase, people-centric PLM targets the design phase. As of 2009, ICT development (EU-funded PROMISE project 2004–2008) has allowed PLM to extend beyond traditional PLM and integrate sensor data and real time 'lifecycle event data' into PLM, as well as allowing this information to be made available to different players in the total lifecycle of an individual product (closing the information loop). This has resulted in the extension of PLM into closed-loop lifecycle management (CL2M).

Links


Dan Lynch interview - Ken Fallon | 2011-12-20

Today we give you another of the interviews from OggCamp where we interview Dan Lynch. Here's his bio from his own site http://danlynch.org/

Dan Lynch

My cartoon imageHello and welcome, I'm Dan. A writer, musician, developer, broadcaster and hopeless geek from Liverpool in the UK. This site is the hub of everything I do online, or at least it's supposed to be but it still needs work. I'm committed to Free & Open Source Software and Creative Commons, I write and broadcast about both, mainly through the Linux Outlaws and Rathole Radio podcasts. You may also know me as a host of FLOSS Weekly on the TWIT Network.

Rathole Radio is my music show where I play a wide selection of the best music on the net. I interview artists, tell silly stories, have live votes and even play songs myself. The music is very eclectic because I believe that all styles have good and bad within them. I want people to open their minds and not pigeon-hole everything. I only play one "style" of music, stuff I like.

Linux Outlaws is a weekly show where I discuss the latest happenings in the Open Source technology world and with my German co-host and friend Fab. It's grown beyond anything we could have imagined. We get tens of thousands of downloads per show, it's taken me to different parts of the world and allowed me to meet and share time with many of my technology heroes. I'm very lucky. Below you will see the latest content from my blog and both these podcasts. You can also use the links on the menu to find more specialised information about my music and other things.

I sing and play guitar in a band called 20lb Sounds. We recently launched our website with free music downloads and we hope to build up a community there. I'm calling it the 20lb Army, so sign up and join the fun :)

I organised a large Free Software and Free Culture event in Liverpool called OggCamp10. Strange name I know but the site explains all that. It took place on 1st and 2nd of May 2010, we were joined by many great FOSS fans and developers from around the world. Not only that but on Friday April 30th 2010 I also ran a successful Rathole Radio gig with David Rovics and Attila The Stockbroker to kick the weekend off.

I support the Open Rights Group and I'm very concerned about digital rights and political matters in the UK. I'm a proud member of both Liverpool LUG and Chester LUG and regularly attend meetings at both. Is this two timing or just a real commitment to FOSS? I'll let you decide ;)

Thanks for visiting. Feel free to hang around a while and put your feet up.


Philip and Rebecca Newborough of CrunchBang - Ken Fallon | 2011-12-06

Today we interview Philip Newborough (aka corenominal) project lead for CrunchBang Linux and their community manager Rebecca Newborough. CrunchBang is a Debian GNU/Linux based distribution offering a great blend of speed, style and substance. Using the nimble Openbox window manager, it is highly customisable and provides a modern, full-featured GNU/Linux system without sacrificing performance.

In September 2011, Philip gave up paid employment to concentrate on personal projects and is now working full-time on CrunchBang Linux. Feel free to donate a over on his sitehttp://crunchbang.org/donate

Links

http://crunchbang.org/
http://www.ubuntu.com/
http://openbox.org/
http://www.xfce.org/
http://technologyserved.com/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CrunchBang_Linux
http://www.debian.org/


Sam Tuke - Free Software Foundation Europe - Ken Fallon | 2011-11-14

fsfe logo
In todays show we interview Sam Tuke the British Team Coordinator and Editorial Team co-ordinator for the Free Software Foundation Europe

Photo of Sam

The Free Software Foundation Europe is dedicated to the furthering of Free Software and working for freedom in the emerging digital society.
Access to software determines who may participate in a digital society. The freedoms to use, study, share, and improve software allow equal participation, and are extremely important.
http://fsfe.org/
http://fsfe.org/about/tuke/tuke.en.html
http://www.fsf.org/
http://oggcamp.org


DJ from h-online.com - Ken Fallon | 2011-10-24

http://hackerpublicradio.org In todays show Ken is at OggCamp and talks to DJ about the online OpenSource and Security news site the H at http://www.h-online.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/honline @honline twitter

From HPR @ OggCamp11


Juergen Schinker open wireless network - Ken Fallon | 2011-10-18

In todays show Ken talks to Juergen Schinker about the OWN Open wireless network at Deptford in London. They run a community network that has cheap routers providing dual wifi networks, one which is private and the other open to your neighbour. They run the Optimized Link State Routing Protocol

From HPR @ OggCamp11

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Optimized_Link_State_Routing_Protocol
http://own.spc.org/drupal/


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OggCamp11 Roundup - Ken Fallon | 2011-10-10

In today's show Ken gives a round-up of OggCamp 11.

We start with a chat with Les Pounder who is crew manager
http://oggcamp.org/

From HPR @ OggCamp11

Next was a discussion with Stuart Langridge formally of lugradio and now working for Canonical on Ubuntu One
http://www.lugradio.org/
http://www.canonical.com/
https://one.ubuntu.com/

From HPR @ OggCamp11

Next he meets up with one of our own hosts Robin Catling who runs the Full Circle podcast and HPR series.
http://fullcirclemagazine.org/category/podcast/
http://hackerpublicradio.org/correspondents.php?hostid=160

From HPR @ OggCamp11

Next was a chat with the organisers Laura Cowen and Alan Pope. Unfortunately the interview with Laura was of too poor audio quality to recover.
http://podcast.ubuntu-uk.org/
http://sixgun.org/linuxoutlaws

From HPR @ OggCamp11

Then it was a quick catchup with Adrian Bradshaw also formally of LugRadio and now working at Red Hat
http://about.me/adrianbradshaw
http://www.redhat.com/

After a live and very poor recording of the song The Elephant In The Room preformed by Dan Lynch of the Linux Outlaws and Rathole Radio
http://danlynch.org/elephant
http://ratholeradio.org/

Finally we round it all up by talking to Les again about how it all was organised, how it went and the future
http://ucubed.info/
http://www.flossie.org/
http://www.fossbox.org.uk/
http://blackpoolgeekup.wordpress.com/


Ana Nelson on Dexy software documentation - Ken Fallon | 2011-08-29

Today Ken interviews Ana Nelson on Dexy a software package to make documentation easy fun and maintainable. @dexyit !hpr

What is Dexy?

Dexy is a tool for writing documents which relate to code. This might mean software documentation, journal articles relating to computational research, a code tutorial on your blog, writing up computer science class assignments, pretty much anything. You can think of Dexy as a very fancy 'make' tool with lots of document-related features and powerful filters. Dexy is open source, licensed under the MIT license.

Follow on twitter http://twitter.com/#!/dexyit

From HPR @ OggCamp11

John Uren on FLOSS in the UK Civil Service - Ken Fallon | 2011-08-18

In this episode Ken talks to John Uren who works in the UK Civil Service. They discuss the issues around Crown Copyright and how it relates to open source. John maintains an etherpad server and has been involved in organizing a open source week to highlight the benefits of open source and free software to Government departments.
https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/EtherPad

Duration: 00:05:49


Interview with Tony Whitmore about OggCamp11 - Ken Fallon | 2011-06-13

In todays episode Ken interviews Tony Whitmore of the Ubuntu-UK Podcastabout OggCamp11.

OggCamp 11 is a two-day technology festival bringing together the most interesting people from the Linux, Open Source and Hardware Hacking communities to share their passion and knowledge on all things geeky in a barcamp-style atmosphere.

Taking place AUGUST 13 & 14, FARNHAM MALTINGS, UK

OggCamp 11 is a two-day unconference where technology enthusiasts come together to exchange knowledge on a wide range of topics from Linux and open source software to building home automation systems. Now in its third year, the event is steadily growing and attracting interesting speakers from all over the UK, the rest of Europe and even the US. Since OggCamp is an unconference, speaking schedules are set on the first day and everyone is free to propose a talk themselves. You are of course free to come along and just listen to other people's talks but we strongly encourage everyone to take part and talk on something they are passionate about in technology. OggCamp was first organised by the combined forces of the Linux Outlaws and the Ubuntu UK Podcast as a filler event after the last LugRadio Live was decided to be a one-day only event.

For the latest news, follow OggCamp 11 on the microblogging service of your choice: identi.ca / Twitter

If you are interested in joining the OggCamp crew or sponsoring the event then please email oggcamp at ubuntu dash uk dot org.